FAQs

What areas of Ohio does “Greater Ohio” encompass?
Volunteers of America of Greater Ohio covers all 88 counties in Ohio with services concentrated in Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Mansfield, Sandusky and Toledo.

With a name like "Volunteers of America," is your organization solely made up of volunteers?
The name Volunteers of America was selected when the national organization was founded in 1896. It signified that the organization was comprised of people who voluntarily chose to help others. Today, the services of the Volunteers of America of Greater Ohio are delivered through a combination of hundreds of paid professional staff, as well as nearly 2,000 community volunteers. While we do offer a variety of volunteer projects within our organization, we are not a clearinghouse for community-wide volunteer opportunities.

How are Volunteers of America programs funded?
We rely on many sources to fund our work. Private support in the form of contributions from individuals is very important. In addition, we seek support from corporations and foundations. In some cases, such as for low-income housing, we charge a fee for services, according to ability to pay. We also receive funds from federal, state and local government to provide services.
 
How can the public be sure that the money Volunteers of America raises goes to help people in need?
We are very proud of the fact that more than 88 cents of every dollar spent by Volunteers of America goes directly to services for individuals, families and communities. Our financial records — and those of our national office — are audited annually by a certified public accounting firm. In addition, we voluntarily disclose information about our finances and operations to various charitable oversight agencies that report to the public. Volunteers of America meets the BBB Wise Giving Alliance's Standards for Charity Accountability.

Is Volunteers of America a faith-based organization?
Yes. Volunteers of America was established by Christian social reformers Ballington and Maud Booth, who defined our mission as “to reach and uplift all people.” We accomplish this goal through a comprehensive approach to ministering to the “whole person” — to an individual's physical, emotional and spiritual needs.

Though we are an organization founded on Christian values, our programs and employment opportunities are available to all people, without regard to religion, race, color, creed, sex, marital status, physical or mental disability, age, national origin or ancestry, sexual orientation, or any other consideration made unlawful by federal, state or local laws.

Is Volunteers of America associated with a church?
Volunteers of America is, itself, a church. We are not formally affiliated with any other church.